Soul

Jamila Woods Brings Soulful Healing to Barracuda

 A sold out show: Jamila Woods and her amazing band brought authentic Chicago strength and soul to Barracuda playing her new album LEGACY! LEGACY! The instruments were dressed with bright colored scarves and a black obelisk donning Wood’s lyrics stood tall behind them on stage. 

Sipping warm tea between songs, Woods radiated humility and gratitude. With impeccable composure and insight, she introduced her songs sharing the inspiration and process behind them.

 

Woods dropped some facts about Frida Kahlo’s life and allowed her lyrics to explain the rest in FRIDA, a songstory about a difficult relationship seeking harmony through boundaries; “I like you better when you see me less...We could do it like Frida, we could build a bridge then I could come see ya.” Her thought-provoking lyrics and her melodic vocals cajole the listener to feel between the lines and awe at her command of figurative language.

 

Her positively-charged-proton presence fills the room. Her poetry amplifies the positivity as her lyrics serve to empower herself and the audience. Do not misunderstand this positivism to mean blind idealism or marxism, the positivity instead represents renewed optimism born from adversity. Her song, EARTHA, addresses the battle some may wage with self worth and self love. Before singing this one she asked us, “Has anyone ever been in a relationship that fucked you up?” Imagine how many people confirmed her question with hoots and hollers.

 

This song, EARTHA, became one of the anthems of the evening as Woods paused, demonstrating how to cast a self-love spell and inviting the audience to participate by joining her  to sing the chorus: “Who gonna share my love for me with me?” Everyone’s relationship with Self is unique to their own, but if you were waiting for permission to love yourSelf, here it is from Jamila Woods. Repeat this chorus as many times as necessary. Follow up with HOLY from her HEAVN album. The audience needed no invitation to sing along to this one, the penultimate song of the evening. The hypnotic hymn provides another powerful mantra and declaration: “Woke up this morning with my mind set on loving me.”

The album’s content and scope reaches deeper and farther than just positivity, but it is by this means that she delivers an end (not the end). OCTAVIA is a song of poetic justice and so, so meta. Woods sings, “it used to be a crime to write a line, our great great greats risked their lives to learn by fireside,” as a reverential nod to her ancestral past. She continues, “We are a precious creation, our black has no imitation.” Her lines can resonate with anyone of any background, but her love for her blood is healing and beautiful.

 

Woods’ words are incredible, but her articulation and delivery is what gives them life. ZORA, named after the author Zora Neale Hurston, catches the ear with how she dissects and “discomobs [our] mold” of understanding. With a touch of zen buddhism, the chorus repeats “you will never know everything, everything. I will never know everything, everything;” and with a sprinkle of peaceful protest the second verse is an embedded poem within the song: “My weaponry/ is my energy/ I tenderly/ fill my enemies/ with white light.”

 

Woods brought more than just good energy to the show on Tuesday night, she brought lasting ruminations, free affirmations, and peaceful incantations. The Chicago spirit of the band blessed this Austin crowd.

 

 

 

-Melissa Green

 

   

TANSU, The Side Project, and Miranda Joan play The Revolution #40 on 06.29

In Volume #40 of the Revolution, a performance series involving emerging NYC artists curated by The National Sawdust, Harlem-based TANSU, NYC's saxophone quartet The Side Project, and Brooklyn singer and songwriter Miranda Joan will be joining together to share Williamsburg venue's stage on June 29th.

TANSU's story includes studies at The Berklee College of Music, one of the few music schools able to develop well-roundied musical artists. Her voice has an impressive strength and vocal range, propelling her modern and sophisticated soul-pop style. Singer songwriter Miranda Joan, who has collaborated already with The Side Project, offers a more mellow and lush take on soul-pop, with electronic flourishes that don't affect the genre's signature relatability. The Side Project, a sax and voice ensemble dedicated to covers of pop hits and led by the saxophonist and producer Éyal Hai, boasts a roster of past shows at The Brooklyn Bowl and The Art Institute of NYC. They recently released their first album, '#ThisPartySax' under the label Rabbit Rabbit Rabbit Records. Tickets for the June 29th show are on sale now here.

   

Makeunder shares new single "In Between My Dead-End Jobs"

Photo credit: Ginger Fierstein

Oakland's Makeunder (aka Hamilton Ulmer) just released another single off forthcoming album Pale Cicada and it's a force of soul and funk, Prince-esq vocals and gyrating horns and baselines. There's so much going on in track "In Between My Dead-End Jobs" that you've got to give it a couple listens. The full album comes out June 28 on Good Eye Records and it's a fun experience of songs that are full of passion and positivity, despite messages full of struggles and loss. - Michelle Kicherer, Associate Editor

   

Soul

Time: 
07:00
Band name: 
Shy Boyz
FULL Artist Facebook address (http://...): 
https://www.facebook.com/shyboyz69/
Venue name: 
Kung Fu Necktie
Band email: 
   

KAINA “Could Be A Curse"

KAINA has released a third single and video called “Could Be A Curse”. The track is taken from her forthcoming debut album, Next To The Sun, and features Sen Morimoto, who also stars in the video.

Next To The Sun will be released on July 12th via Sooper Records and can be preorder here.

You can catch KAINA at Lincoln Hall on July 14th with Sen Morimoto, Luna Luna, Kara Jackson, and Kahekili.