Orchestral

PREMIERE: Green and Glass's debut is mystic chamber-pop, play Threes Brewing 3.4

It’s rare that a record is able to capture a perfect balance of forward momentum and somber reflection, yet this is precisely what New York avant-pop ensemble Green and Glass have accomplished on their debut full length. Such conflicting feelings are likely a product of the band’s methodical instrumentation, the joining of parts from the old world (harps, horns, and drums) and the new (keys and electric bass), which as set pieces for bandleader Lucia Stavros’ show-stealing, often mysterious lyricism, creates an intergenerational atmosphere — chamber pop that feels as modern as it does baroque. This tone is set early in the record on “Green and Glass” and “14 Hours,” whose march-like tempos, somber brass lines and cool synths serve as distinctive introductory fanfares; while the song’s formats may seem familiar at first, the script is immediately upended by the band’s diverse instrumental offerings. This energy continues throughout standout track “Sand,” where the unison of harp and electric guitar against a stuttering percussive line paves the way for an ethereal overture that perfectly blends woodwind and midi leads. In all, Green and Glass delights and surprises at every turn, a lush, experimental yet accessible record that will feel immediately at home with fans of San Fermin or Hundred Waters — stream our premiere below, and catch the band at Threes Brewing on March 4th for their record release show. Photo by Maura McGee

   

Sarah Golley spills her heart in new record "As We Crawl"

An authentic poet is Norwalk, Connecticut’s Sarah Golley: the artist’s complete devotion to maximum exposure is the trademark of her latest record As We Crawl. From the spoken poetry of the opening track, “From the Sea,” to the grandiose string-instrument-driven composition that backs up her soulful vocals in “At a Snail’s Pace” the album opens majestically. The honeyed symphonies continue in tracks like “Over Time” and “Into the Flames” where the melodious grand piano keys fire away as Golley dramatically spills her heart; the music takes on a rich theatrical form that is as exquisite as it is immersive. Sarah Golley channels ferocious energy in the vein of artists like Amanda Palmer, yet her music has a softer touch to it that is rooted in the theatricality of it all. Tracks like “On the Treadmill of Thought” hypnotize with vibrant harmonies and thunderous kick drum patterns. From the onset, As We Crawl requests one surrender their thoughts and emotions entirely to each piece, weaving both for an experience unique, and satisfying. Listen to the gravity with which “Through a Black Hole,” from the new album, blossoms below. - Rene Cobar, photo by Jesse Newman

   

Happy Birthday, Deli Magazine New England!

There are so many things to be grateful for today: family, friends, good food, good times. Here at Deli New England, we are grateful for one more thing, and that is the opportunity to cover New England’s always-thriving music scene. For ten years, we have been privileged to witness the rise of talented artists from Connecticut’s New York border to Maine’s Atlantic seaboard. Since the birth of this branch, on this date ten years ago, we have had our many editors explore with delight hip-hop acts, indie-pop darlings, rock-punks, and so much more. Below you will find nine posts from different editors of this magazine over the last ten years. A big thank you to Meghan Chiampa for kicking off this journey and letting me know of the special occasion at hand. Happy holidays and happy reading! - Rene Cobar

Meghan Chiampa on Brendan Hogan (2010)

Chrissy Prisco on Boy Without God (2011)

Dean Shakked on High Pop (2012)

Jake Reed on Deja Carr (2013)

Daniel McMahon on Here We Just Dream (2014)

Zach Weg on And the Kids (2015)

Olivia Sisinni on Dreamtigers (2016)

Cameron Carr on Clairo (2017)

Lilly Milman on People Like You (2018)

   

Rhett Price offers a taste of urban classicism in new single "Get It"

There is nothing quite like discovering new music that is provocative, inspiring, and tastefully unique. Boston’s Rhett Price impresses with his novel take on hip-hop: by letting luscious violin melodies lead the way Rhett creates feverish beats that have a touch of the classical, an urban haze to them, and an elegant club tinge. The intrepid violin work of Rhett is on full display in the artist’s latest track, “Get It,” which boasts an ominous-lingering bass that complements the violin flourishes coloring the composition. The song is direct, graceful, dangerous, and wholly unique. Rhett is an artist doing things his way, one not afraid to try something different; if you ask us, we say that he is walking down the right path. Stream his latest single below and discover something different. - Rene Cobar

   

Hallelujah the Hills previews new album with dual singles

The cool winds of the fall are settled in, but New England bands are still bringing in the heat. Such is the case with Boston’s Hallelujah the Hills, whose dual singles are hot alt-rock music to gather around. “Folk Music Is Insane” is melodic in the verses and destructive in the choruses: from grand piano embellishments to swelling orchestral instrumentation drowned in guitar distortion, you never quite know where the song is headed, and that is alright. “Running Hot With Fate” has more of an indie feel to it, with harmonies glazed atop a steady rhythm section that drives the song forward with sweet style (you can’t help but be infected by the groove). Hallelujah the Hills is not afraid to go big; the band stands out by blending indie rock with a distinct Americana touch—now that is different. The singles are part of the band’s upcoming album, I’m You, which is slated for release November 15, 2019. Stream “Running Hot With Fate” below to start your week right. - Rene Cobar